Pitch Deck Pointers Part 1: Introduction

A new series from Innovation Bay that breaks down the pitch deck, slide by slide, with commentary from some of Australia’s top VCs.

About the Pitch Deck Pointers Series

What is a pitch deck?

The goal of a pitch deck

  1. Gets you a meeting
  2. Gets investors interested at an initial meeting and wanting to know more

Before you start

General Pitch Deck Do’s and Don’ts

Do:

  1. One idea per slide. Each slide should drive home a specific point.
  2. Use fast facts and data. Investors like facts, numbers and statistics. You want to educate and excite investors so, they can easily repeat and recall what you said when they’re talking about your business to others.
  3. Make the most of every word. Instead of naming your slides “The Problem” or “The Solution”, utilise the header to tell a progressive story that leads to a conclusion.
  4. Reduce friction. When sending your deck via email, send it as a PDF. Don’t put unnecessary boundaries between investors and your pitch deck with confusing formats and compatibility issues. PDFs are the simplest, easiest option. If you’re committed to tracking investor engagement, opt for a simple, low-friction link share.
  5. Keep evolving. Your pitch deck is a living document that you will refine after each investor meeting. Listen carefully to investors feedback and questions, identify the gaps, hone in on what are people missing, and update your deck accordingly.

Don’t:

  1. Include too much information on each slide. This deck is a brief outline of your business, not a complete company profile. No slide should have more than 25 words.
  2. Pad your stats. False statements and figures are a big no-no. If you don’t know the answer to a question, be upfront. Figure it out afterwards instead of making up an untrue answer on the spot.
  3. Get too technical. You’ll alienate your audience if you keep using terms, abbreviations, and acronyms they’re unfamiliar with. Keep your language simple.
  4. Rely on cliches. Avoid statements like “my company is the Uber of XYZ”. Opt for originality over fluffy jargon.
  5. Ask investors to sign an NDA. This is a big no-no. An investors job is to meet lots of founders and learn about their company, they are not in the business of stealing your idea.

The Intro Slide

Part 1: The Intro Slide.

The purpose of this slide and why it’s important to an investor

  • What is your company?
  • Who are you?
  • What’s the mission?
  • How do I contact you?

Common mistakes made on this slide

--

--

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store
Innovation Bay

Innovation Bay is a community group bringing together extraordinary people who are passionate about #innovation, #entrepreneurship, #startups and #technology.